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Table 2 Energy balance-related behaviours (EBRBs) in Dutch and Non-Western boys

From: Ethnic differences in BMI among Dutch adolescents: what is the role of screen-viewing, active commuting to school, and consumption of soft drinks and high-caloric snacks?

   Dutch Non-Western
EBRBs n mean (std) median
(25th – 75th percentile)
mean (std) median
(25th – 75th percentile)
P Value*
Screen-viewing behaviour, min/day
television viewing 451 164 (96.8) 141 (94.3 – 212) 191 (108) 180 (86.8 – 267) .074
computer use 433 123 (86.0) 98 (60.0 – 178) 141 (80.7) 129 (77.1 – 30.0) .275
Physical activity, min/day
active transport to school 469 38.0 (29.6) 30.0 (14.0 – 60.0) 28.42 (24.9) 30.0 (10.0 – 30.0) .006
organized sports 322 33.8 (19.6) 32.1 (18.6 – 42.9) 34.2 (20.3) 28.6 (21.4 – 49.3) .275
unorganized sports 245 93.3 (111) 51.4 (25.7 – 111) 126 (1434) 164 (32.1 – 159) .912
Consumption of sugar-containing drinks, ml/day
soft drinks 375 890 (710) 685 (347 – 1251) 1041 (780) 918 (153 – 1438) .331
fruit juices 392 330 (391) 171 (28.6 – 468) 507 (499) 386 (10.2 – 788) .025
High-caloric snack consumption, portions/day
savoury snacks 415 .59 (.51) .43 (.29 – .86) .66 (.54) .43 (0.29 – 1.00) .660
sweet snacks 427 1.58 (1.17) 1.00 (.71 – 2.00) 1.26 (.97) .93 (.54 – 2.00) .141
  1. *comparing Dutch and Non-Western adolescents, using the Mann-Whitney Test