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Table 2 Brisk walking and potential mediators by treatment group at baseline, 3 months, and 6 months

From: Analysis of Individual Social-ecological Mediators and Moderators and Their Ability to Explain Effect of a Randomized Neighborhood Walking Intervention

  Baseline 3 months 6 months p-valuea
  N Mean (SD) N Mean (SD) N Mean (SD) Time Interventionxtime
Minutes of brisk walking
   Control 277 58.3 (78.1) 270 60.1 (78.4) 265 58.3 (78.8) 0.86 <0.0001
   Intervention 260 42.9 (68.1) 172 83.1 (66.7) 159 75.5 (69.1) <0.0001  
Social cohesion
   Control 277 3.3 (0.5) 270 3.5 (0.5) 266 3.5 (0.5) <0.0001 0.012
   Intervention 260 3.2 (0.5) 170 3.5 (0.4) 158 3.5 (0.4) <0.0001  
Walking efficacy
   Control 278 7.2 (2.3) 270 6.8 (2.2) 265 6.6 (2.1) <0.0001 0.32
   Intervention 262 8.0 (1.4) 172 7.8 (1.6) 160 7.7 (1.4) 0.0042  
Perception of neighborhood problems
   Control 277 14.5 (6.2) 269 14.5 (5.9) 266 14.1 (6.0) 0.27 0.002
   Intervention 261 14.3 (6.4) 171 15.4 (5.6) 158 15.9 (5.4) 0.0032  
  1. a Adjusted for: Individual-level Covariates: Age, Gender, Race/ethnicity (White and Non-White), Years of education (0–12 years, ≥ 13 years), Annual household income (<$15,000, $15,000–$29,999, ≥ 30,000), General health (poor to fair, good to excellent), walking efficacy. Neighborhood-level Covariates: Neighborhood poverty (proportion of households in the neighborhood with incomes < $15,000), Perceived neighborhood safety ("It is safe to walk or jog alone in my neighborhood during the day," rated on a five point scale from 1 [strongly disagree] to 5 [strongly agree]).