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Table 3 Responses towards the nine specifically asked pricing strategies.

From: Perceptions on the use of pricing strategies to stimulate healthy eating among residents of deprived neighbourhoods: a focus group study

  Pricing strategy Positive (++) Negative (--)
1 Tax increase on unhealthy food items - unhealthy food may become less attractive - may result in opposite effects
- patronizing
- is not effective, food remains attractive
- is regressive
2 Subsidizing healthy foods - motivating
- encouraging to buy more healthy food
- direct effect
- applies to whole population
- someone has to pay for the allowances
3 Allowance for low-income groups designed to purchase healthy food - extra money may result in buying more healthy food - extra money may not be spent on healthy foods
- indirect effect
- restricted to low-income consumers
4 Insurance premium cutback when a healthy diet is comprised - motivating
- encouraging to buy more healthy food
- difficult to implement
- unverifiable
- indirect effect
5 Healthy food options being on offer more frequently - motivating
- stimulating to buy more healthy food
- direct effect
- saved money may not be spend on healthy foods
6 Prohibition of discounts on unhealthy food items - fair (especially involving children)
- discouraging
- patronizing
- difficult to implement
7 Offering small presents, extras or saving stamps with healthy food items - motivating
- encouraging to buy more healthy food (especially for children)
- none listed
8 Making healthy food items cheaper and unhealthy food items more expensive - fair
- encouraging to buy more healthy food
- more effective than only providing discounts on healthy foods
- difficult to implement
9 Healthy food items discount card exclusively for low-income groups - fair
- encouraging to buy more healthy food
- discount cards are heavily used and effective
- indirectly, people have to pay for such allowances
- restricted to low-income consumers