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Table 4 Moderation analyses for total sedentary behavior

From: Effectiveness of interventions using self-monitoring to reduce sedentary behavior in adults: a systematic review and meta-analysis

Moderator Number of studies Combined sample size Hedges’ g 95% CI Q P
Intervention length      1,93 0,17
 Short (≤ 12 weeks) [36, 38, 41,42,43, 47, 48, 50, 52, 55] 11 1653 0,23 0,04 – 0,41   
 Long (>  12 weeks) [39, 40, 44,45,46] 5 440 0,49 0,17 – 0,81   
Main purpose of self-monitoring tool      1,95 0,16
 To measure physical activity [37, 39, 41, 44, 46,47,48, 50, 55] 9 549 0,43 0,22 – 0,65   
 To measure sedentary behavior [36, 38, 40, 42, 43, 45, 52] 7 1524 0,19 -0,07 – 0,45   
Way of self-monitoring      5,67 0,02
 Subjective self-monitoring [43, 52, 55] 3 209 -0,02 -0,29 – 0,26   
 Objective self-monitoring [36,37,38,39,40,41,42, 44,45,46,47,48, 50] 13 1864 0,40 0,19– 0,60   
Age group      0,17 0,68
 Adults (mean age: 18–60 years) [36, 38, 40,41,42,43, 45,46,47, 50, 55] 11 1752 0,34 0,11 – 0,57   
 Older adults (mean age > 60 years) [37, 39, 44, 48, 52] 5 321 0,27 0,02 – 0,52   
Health status      0,03 0,86
 Healthy participants [38, 39, 42, 43, 45, 47, 48, 50, 52] 9 708 0,33 0,03 – 0,63   
 Participants with overweight/obesity or another clinical condition [36, 40, 41, 44, 55] 7 1365 0,30 0,08 – 0,52   
Focus of the intervention      2,88 0,09
 Only sedentary behavior 9 671 0,45 0,15 – 0,75   
 Sedentary behavior and physical activitya 7 1402 0,16 0,001 – 0,31   
  1. Hedges’ g (random effects); CI confidence interval, Q homogeneity statistic (mixed effects), aOne study focused on sedentary behavior, physical activity and dietary behavior