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Table 3 Overview of goals, initial ideas, change objectives and the developed intervention activities

From: Co-designing obesity prevention interventions together with children: intervention mapping meets youth-led participatory action research

Goals retrieved from performance objectivesInitial ideas that were voted forExamples of related change objectives on the children’s levelIntervention activities and implementation status
Children always eat a healthy (amount of) breakfast in the morning before they go to schoolCreate a lesson series on what a healthy breakfast is and combine it with quiz elements, then children will like it more and remember the message (school 1, 2, 3)Children know different kinds of healthy breakfast
Children recognize that peers have a healthy breakfast
Children have positive feelings towards a healthy breakfast
Cooking workshops (implementation plan in Additional file 3): at first of a duration of 1 month, then they were taken over by a community partner who organizes it throughout the year
Quiz at school (once) and regularly recurring at after-school activities
Children eat less unhealthy snacks at schoolOrganize a competition at school where you can win a prize if you take healthy snacks and lunch to school (every month a different prize) (school 2)Children describe what healthy snacks are
Children describe the importance of eating enough fruits and vegetables every day
Children recognize that peers eat fruits and vegetables during breaks
Healthy snacks and lunch competition at school during 3 months
Cooking workshops: at first of a duration of 1 month, then they were taken over by a community partner who organizes it throughout the year
Children drink only water at schoolCreate a water fountain at the school playground where you can always drink water during and after school (school 1, 3)
Start a policy at school that children can only drink water (school 3)
Children recognize that peers only drink water at school
It is a habit that everybody has a water bottle with them
Children demonstrate how they can make water taste better (e.g. by adding fruits)
Water fountain installed at one school, together with a policy that children can only drink water at school (school 3)
Children drink tea without sugarCreate a lesson series where children learn to drink tea without sugar, then they will get used to it and like it (school 1)Children acknowledge that tea with sugar is not healthy
Children demonstrate how they can make tea taste better, without adding sugar
Children demonstrate the confidence that they can break tea drinking habits
Cooking workshops: at first of a duration of 1 month, then they were taken over by a community partner who organizes it throughout the year
More children play outside (actively)Make playgrounds with equipment suitable for children of different ages and teach children active games that they can play there (school 1, 3)Children describe active games that they can play
Children demonstrate different kinds of active games that they can play at a playground
Children recognize that peers play fun active games outside
The local government adjusted several already existing playgrounds
After school activities were organized for 4 months where children learned new active games that they could play
In after-school activities of this project and also of community partners, more focus was placed on active games that children themselves could play without a lot of extra materials
More girls participate in after-school sports activitiesOrganize more girls-only activities, and ask girls what kind of activities they like (school 1, 2)Girls recognize that physical activity is important
Girls see other girls having fun in sports activities
Girls have positive feelings towards the activities that are organized for them
A weekly girls-only activity was started for the duration of 2 years
Children participate in sports activities of their own preferenceLet children themselves co-organize activities and make sure there are good coaches to supervise, so they will like it more (school 1, 2, 3)Children know the sports activity that they prefer
Children demonstrate confidence in participating in sports activities independent of their friends
Children like participating in sports activities (that they have organized)
The Olympic sports event consists of yearly after-school sports activities followed by a sports tournament for the four schools in the community (implementation plan in Additional file 2)
Children co-organized all intervention activities
In after-school activities of this project and also of community partners, the aim was to give children a positive sports experience
In after-school activities of this project and also of community partners, children could co-decide on the activities that were offered
Less children are behind a screen after school (computer, television, phone)Organize more after-school sports activities and events so children are stimulated to play outside (school 1, 2)Children describe the advantages of playing outside over screen time
Children acknowledge that screen activities are for the late afternoon/evening
Children perceive that peers are not behind a screen after school
After-school sports activities were organized during 4 months where children learned new active games that they could play
In after-school sport activities of this project and also of community partners, more focus was placed on activities that children themselves could play without a lot of extra materials
The Olympic sports event consists of yearly after-school sports activities followed by a sports tournament for the four schools in the community (implementation plan in Additional file 2)
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