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Table 1 Design attributes and levels, and reference levels for analysis, and information provided to participants

From: Understanding the influence of physical resources and social supports on primary food providers’ snack food provision: a discrete choice experiment

Attribute Attribute level Excerpts from participant information
Cost of snack Cheaper (reference level)
More expensive
When considering the cost think about what you would think of as a: cheap and expensive snack as a reference point.
Time to prepare Instant (reference level)
Quick
More time consuming
This will vary from instant which would be almost instant or ready to eat (such as taken straight from the fridge or pantry), quick so a few minutes (such as chopping, toasting or plating), or more time consuming which would be around 5 min or more (such as cooking, preparing multiple components).
Child’s likely response Accepting (reference level)
Resistant
Think about past experiences and how your child has responded to the food options you provide.
For example, if it is a food your child does not prefer or may not feel like they might have been resistant to eating it.
Co-parent support Supportive
Unsupportive (reference level)
This refers to partners or co-parents. The opinion or role of these significant family members may vary between options from supportive (or consistent with you) to unsupportive (or undermining), depending on their values for food provision.
Family friend support Supportive
Unsupportive (reference level)
This refers to your (or your partners) friends with kids that you would spend time with as a family. As with family members the opinion or role of these family friends may vary between options from supportive (or consistent with you) to unsupportive (or undermining), depending on their values for food provision.
Type of food Everyday foods
Sometimes foods (reference level)
Everyday foods are the foods and drinks that we commonly refer to as the ‘five food group’ or ‘staple/core’ foods that we include in our meals and snacks every day. These foods come from the fruit, vegetable, dairy or alternatives, grain foods, and meat or alternatives food groups
Sometimes foods are the foods and drinks that we commonly refer to as ‘extras’, ‘treats’ or ‘junk food’. Some examples include crisps, pastries, pizza, cake, sweet or savory biscuits, chocolate, muesli bars, and sugary drinks.