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Table 4 Complex samples logistic regression and CSGLMa: associations between overall home environment composite and corresponding diet, physical activity and screen-based sedentary behaviours (n = 298)

From: The Home Environment Interview and associations with energy balance behaviours and body weight in school-aged children – a feasibility, reliability, and validity study

Dietary intake behaviours Home environment composite
N (%) OR (95%CI)1 P value
 Fruit (≥twice per day) 173 (58.1%) 0.40 (0.26–0.61) <.001
 Vegetables (≥twice per day) 239 (80.2%) 0.30 (0.18–0.52) <.001
 Energy-dense snacks (≥once per day) 224 (75.2%) 1.71 (1.08–2.69) .022
 Fast food intake (≥once per week) 59 (19.8%) 3.09 (1.90–5.04) <.001
 Convenience food (≥twice per week) 106 (35.6%) 2.58 (1.64–4.05) <.001
 Sugar Sweetened Beverages (≥once per day) 25 (8.4%) 1.61 (0.92–2.82) .097
 Artificially-sweetened beverages (≥once per day) 97 (32.6%) 1.54 (1.03–2.29) .034
 Fruit juice (≥once per day) 125 (41.9%) 0.93 (0.66–1.31) .678
 Milk (≥twice per day) 85 (28.6%) 1.36 (0.97–1.93) .076
Activity behaviours N (%) OR (95% CI)  
 Physical activity (more active) 177 (59.4%) 0.57 (0.40–0.80) .002
Screen-based sedentary behavioursb Mean (SD) Β (±SE) R2  
 TV viewing and screen time (hours/ week) 16.73 (9.70) 4.55 (±.78) .175 <.001
 Video game use (hours/week) 6.91 (6.82) 1.56 (±.43) .325 <.001
  1. OR Odds Ratio, 95% CI = 95% confidence interval
  2. aAdjusting for clustering within families (complex samples analyses), the child’s age at time of home environment interview, child sex
  3. bSedentary behaviours were treated as a continuous variable as there are no specific guidelines for duration of screen-time and video game use in this age group [30]