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Table 3 Energy balance-related behaviours (EBRBs) in Dutch and Non-Western girls

From: Ethnic differences in BMI among Dutch adolescents: what is the role of screen-viewing, active commuting to school, and consumption of soft drinks and high-caloric snacks?

   Dutch Non-Western
EBRBs n mean (std) median
(25th – 75th percentile)
mean (std) median
(25th – 75th percentile)
P Value*
Screen-viewing behaviour, min/day
television viewing 461 142 (86.4) 120 (77.1 – 180) 1867 (112) 161 (93.8 – 272) .033
computer use 429 89 (67.6) 68.6 (34.29 – 120) 102 (71.2) 81.4 (60.0 – 137) .529
Physical activity, min/day
active transport to school 480 36.8 (28.3) 30.0 (18.0 – 60.0) 27.3 (24.9) 20.0 (10.0 – 30.0) 480
organized sports 305 23.5 (16.4) 19.3 (10.7 – 30.0) 26.1 (18.6) 18.2 (11.8 – 37.5) 305
unorganized sports 204 53.4 (75.6) 34.3 (17.1 – 51.4) 75.4 (93.6) 34.3 (17.1 – 90.0) 204
Consumption of sugar-containing drinks, ml/day
soft drinks 395 774 (634) 657 (281 – 1142) 918 (700) 714 (439 – 1189) 395
fruit juices 396 326 (342) 200 (57.1 – 486) 476 (462) 323 (108 – 641) 396
High-caloric snack consumption, portions/day
savoury snacks 453 .58 (.51) .43 (.14 – 86) .77 (.59) .57 (.29 – 1.00) .044
sweet snacks 464 1.38 (.98) 1.00 (.57 – 2.00) 1.23 (1.10) .86 (.43 – 2.00) .094
  1. *comparing Dutch and Non-Western adolescents, using the Mann-Whitney Test