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Table 3 Characteristics of studies included in the systematic review (listed by author's last name and publication year)

From: Systematic review of the validity and reliability of consumer-wearable activity trackers

Author (year) Location of lab or recruitment area Sample size (for validity and reliability studies) Mean age (SD), range Mean body mass index (SD), range in kilograms/ meters squared Data collection year(s) Inclusion criteria
Adam Noah (2013) [29] Northeastern university, US 16 and 23 (V and R) 26.7 (7.6) Not reported 2011-2012 Apparently healthy participants, had to participate in moderate to vigorous physical activity based on the International Physical Activity Questionnaire (> = 150 minutes/week of moderate intensity or > =75 minutes/week of vigorous intensity)
Bai (2015) [45] Ames, Iowa, US 52 (V) 18–65 24.0, 17.6–39.9 2014 Apparently healthy adults with no major surgeries in the past year
Case (2015) [30] Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, US 14 (V) 28.1 (6.2) 22.7 (1.5) 2014 Apparently healthy adults
Dannecker (2013) [31] Fort Collins and Denver, Colorado, US 19 (V) 26.9 (6.6) 25.1 (4.6) 2010 Apparently healthy adults, inactive to moderately active (<6 hours/week of exercise)
de Zambotti (2015a) [47] San Francisco, California, US 28 (V) 50.1 (3.9) 24.6 (3.6) 2014–2015 Perimenopausal women
de Zambotti (2015b) [48] San Francisco, California, US 65 (V) 15.8 (2.5) 21.2 (3.5) 2014 Apparently healthy without sleep disorders
Diaz (2015) [15] New York City, New York, US 23 (V and R) 20–54 19.6–29.9 2013–2014 Apparently healthy
Dontje (2015)[32] Groningen, The Netherlands 1 (R) 46 Not reported 2012 Not reported
Ferguson (2015) [33] Adelaide, South Australia 21 (V) 32.8 (10.2), 20–59 27.3 (3.2) male; 25.5 (5.2) female 2013 Apparently healthy
Gusmer (2014) [34] Minneapolis, Minnesota, US 32 (V) 21.1 (1.7), 18–29 Not reported 2012 Apparently healthy
Lauritzen (2013) [23] Seville, Spain 6 (V) 35.3 (6.5), 24–45 Not reported not reported Not reporting on sample with reduced mobility and no results on older sample with normal mobility
Lee (2014) [35] Ames, Iowa, US 60 (V) 24.2 (4.7) female; 28.6 (6.4) male 24.3 (2.6), 19.528.0 male; 21.8 (2.7), 18.1–31.2 female 2013 No major disease and nonsmokers
Mammen (2012) [36] Toronto, Canada 10 (V)and 1 (R) 23.0 (1.2), 20–25 21.4 (1.9) 2011–2012 Healthy young adults
Meltzer (2015) [37] Birmingham, Alabama, US 63 (V) and 9 (R) 9.7 (4.6), 3–17 Not reported 2012–2013 Sample referred to clinic for sleep disordered breathing; results of polysomnography indicated: 61 % none, 23 % mild, 16 % moderate to severe
Montgomery-Downs (2012) [38] Morgantown, West Virginia, US 24 (V) and 3 (R) 26.1, 19–41 Not reported 2010 Healthy adults, no sleep disorders
Sasaki (2015) [39] Amherst, Massachusetts, US 20 (V) 24.1 (4.5) 23.9 (2.9) 2011–2012 Apparently healthy
Simpson (2015) [46] Vancouver, Canada 42 (V) 73 (6.9) 26.1 (4.6) 2014 > = 65 years, able to walk unassisted
Stackpool (2014) [40] LaCrosse, Wisconsin, US 20 (V) 18–44 Not reported 2013 Healthy volunteers; all were recreationally active (2–5 hours/week)
Stahl (2014) [41] Morgantown, West Virginia, US 10 (V) 63.8 (3.2), 60–68 24.5 (4.2) 2011 None noted; on average participants reported 3 chronic health conditions, no functional limitations, and rated their health as "good"
Storm (2015) [42] Sheffield, United Kingdom 16 (V) 28.9 (2.7) 23.5 (2.3) 2013 No reported impairment or morbidity that could interfere with physical activity assessment
Takacs (2014) [43] Vancouver, Canada 30 (V and R) 29.6 (5.7) 22.7 (3.0) 2013 Able to walk on a treadmill for 30 min; no neurological, cognitive or musculoskeletal disorders
Tully (2014) [44] Belfast, Northern Ireland 42 (V) 43 Not reported 2013 Apparently healthy staff of Queen's University Belfast
  1. Abbreviations: R reliability sample size, SD standard deviation, US United States, V validity sample size