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Table 2 Association between soft drink intake and body weight change in the health workers cohort study, 2004–2010 (N = 1268)

From: Soft drink intake is associated with weight gain, regardless of physical activity levels: the health workers cohort study

CharacteristicsModel 1
β-coefficient (95% CI)
Model 2
β-coefficient (95% CI)
Soft drink (servings/day)0.03 (−0.64, 0.70)− 0.02 (− 0.84, 0.79)
Time (years)0.46 (0.23, 0.68)0.45 (0.22, 0.68)
Soft drink x time0.10 (0.00, 0.19)0.11 (−0.02, 0.23)
Physical activity
 Low (referent)
 High0.42 (−0.19, 1.03)0.34 (−0.40, 1.08)
Physical activity x time−0.11 (− 0.23, 0.01)−0.10 (− 0.24, 0.05)
Soft drink x physical activity0.18 (− 0.84, 1.20)
Sex x time0.08 (−0.03, 0.18)0.07 (− 0.03, 0.18)
Baseline age x time−0.02 (− 0.02, − 0.02)−0.02 (− 0.02, − 0.02)
Soft drink x physical activity x time− 0.03 (− 0.27, 0.21)
AIC test12,149.5912,153.29
BIC test12,301.3912,316.77
  1. Model 1: Individual-level fixed effects model of two-way interaction terms (soft drink and time, physical activity and time, sex and time, and baseline age and time), adjusted for education, chronic diseases, smoking status, TV viewing time per week, total daily sleep, alcohol intake and food groups: red meat, total dairy, fruits, vegetables, nuts, yogurt, white bread, tortillas and orange juice. Model 2: Individual-level fixed effects model of three-way interaction terms (soft drink, time and physical activity), included two-way interaction terms (soft drink and time, physical activity and time, physical activity and soft drink, sex and time, and baseline age and time) adjusted by the same set of covariates of model 1. Age and sex were centered at the baseline mean in both models. CI confidence interval, AIC Akaike information criterion, BIC Bayesian information criterion
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